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Hearing Library

Another resource to provide you with access to many helpful hearing related articles.

What is Ringing in the Ears (Tinnitus)?

An estimated 40 to 50 million people in the United States experience tinnitus. It is unknown what exactly causes tinnitus. Tinnitus is usually described as a ringing in the ear or a variation of hissing, roaring, whistling, chirping or clicking. Some tinnitus is normal, but tinnitus may also indicate that there is damage to some of the hearing structures. Loud noise exposure is known to cause tinnitus, both temporarily and permanently. Some medications and diseases of the inner ear can also cause tinnitus. Additionally, advancing age has also been associated with tinnitus.

What is an Audiologist?

Audiologists are health-care professionals who evaluate, diagnose, treat, and manage hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance disorders. An Audiologist is a person who holds a minimum of a Masters degree in Audiology.

Do I Need Two Hearing Aids?

Basically, if you have two ears with hearing loss that could benefit from hearing aids, you need two hearing aids. It is important to realize there are no “normal” animals born with only one ear. Simply stated, you have two ears because you need two ears.

How do I know if I have Hearing Loss?

Hearing loss is a natural part of the aging process. Hearing challenges can begin to present themselves based upon your hearing health history, including exposure to loud noise, certain medications, infections, head or ear trauma, congenital (birth or prenatal) or hereditary factors, as well as a number of other causes.

Type and Degree of Hearing Loss

Results of the audiometric evaluation are plotted on a chart called an audiogram. Loudness is plotted from top to bottom. Frequency, from low to high, is plotted from left to right.

Types of Hearing Aids

There are many styles of hearing aids. The degree of the hearing loss, power and options required, manual dexterity abilities, cost factors, and cosmetic concerns are some of the factors that will determine the style the patient will use.

Candidates for ALDs

People with all degrees and types of hearing loss — even people with normal hearing can benefit from assistive listening devices.

Hearing, Hearing Loss and Hearing Aids: Issues and Answers

Hearing loss occurs to most people as they age. Hearing loss can be due to the aging process, exposure to loud noise, certain medications, infections, head or ear trauma, congenital (birth or prenatal) or hereditary factors, diseases, as well as a number of other causes.

Hearing Aids: Reasonable Expectations for the Consumer

Since you are considering the purchase of hearing aids, it’s important for you to establish reasonable expectations from these highly sophisticated, miniature devices.

Hearing Aid Compatibility - Cell Phones - Land Lines

Millions of people who wear hearing aids have a difficult time with the use of cell phones. The problem is the way that sound is emitted over a wireless network. The conversation is transmitted using radio waves…

What are the Different Types of Hearing Loss

Hearing loss is described by varying degrees, not percentages. Hearing loss may be mild, moderate, moderately-severe, severe or profound and vary across pitches. It can be temporary or permanent. It is determined by a simple hearing test as the amount of volume loss you experience compared to an average of many other adult listeners with normal auditory systems.

How Long Does a Hearing Aid Last?

Hearing aids, when taken care of properly, can last upwards of ten years or more. However, digital technology changes and improves quickly. Users of hearing aids may find that it is beneficial to upgrade their hearing aids every three to five years to take advantage of the improvements in technology.

What is Early Intervention

Early intervention applies to children of school age or younger who are discovered to have or be at risk of developing a handicapping condition or other special need that may affect their development. Early intervention…

What is a Hearing Instrument Specialist?

A hearing instrument specialist (HIS) is a professional trained specifically in the fitting of the hearing aids and assistive listening devices.